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Travel and perspective

I've been back a week from 3 weeks in Buenos Aires and have been so impressed with the quality of the events in Welli, the lack of collisions on the dance floor, the number of people dancing milonga (almost all the dancers last night), and the overall level of dancing. 

The great thing about going away is the fresh perspective that it gives you about your home. This is especially true for tango, especially if you live in Welli. 

Congratulations to the Welli dancers, the organisers, their helpers and the teachers. 


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